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CTSA Hub Awards Announced


NCATS announces 18 Clinical and Translational Science Awards (CTSA) Program Hubs Awards. Congratulations to ACTS Member Institutions receiving this award.

To see a list of recent awardees, please click here.
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Coming Soon - Nominations for TS2016 Career Achievement and Contributions Awards

The sponsoring and partnering organizations of Translational Science 2016 will acknowledge the outstanding contributions of investigators and educators in the field at Translational Science 2016, April 13-15, 2016 in Washington, D.C.

Recipients of each award will be recognized during the meeting. Nominations will be accepted for the following awards:

1. Edward H. Ahrens, Jr Distinguished Investigator Award: This award is named in honor of Edward H. (Pete) Ahrens, Jr., recognizing a senior investigator whose innovative research has had a major impact on clinical practice and health care for the benefit of the public.

2. Clinical and Translational Research Distinguished Educator Award: This award recognizes an investigator who has distinguished him or herself as a researcher, mentor and academic leader. Students and trainees are also invited to submit nominations.

3. Translational Science Outstanding New Investigator Award: This Award recognizes an investigator’s pathway to excellence in achieving an independent research career in biomedical research. The recipient will be required to present his/her research at the AFMR Henry Christian Dinner.

4. Team Science Award: This award recognizes the importance of interdisciplinary teams to the translation of research discoveries into clinical applications and eventually widespread clinical practice.

Look for more information about these awards coming soon!
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JAMA Forum Publishes New Article on Why AHRQ is Important

In the JAMA Forum published piece, Dr. Wilensky breaks down her messages into two overarching points: first explaining why AHRQ is important in the context of the broader health care system (and among the other federal research agencies) and then highlighting some of its key contributions over the years.

To read the full article, please click here. Tweet it out to your networks using the hashtag #SaveAHRQ.

Signatures are still being accepted for the Friends of AHRQ letter to congressional appropriators. To show your organization's support, complete this Google Form by COB Friday, October 16.
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From the Hill--ACTS Advocacy News
Proposed FY 2016 Funding Increases for NIH

Presently, the House and Senate have proposed FY 2016 funding increases for the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in their annual Labor-Health and Human Services-Education Appropriations Bills. However, this new funding is offset by deep cuts to other federal medical research and public health programs. The administration has indicated that they may veto appropriations bills that reach the president’s desk with current, low spending allocations.

Read more details by clicking on the ACTS Advocacy page.
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HHS Offers OHRP Webinar Series on the Common Rule NPRM

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and fifteen other Federal Departments and Agencies have announced proposed revisions to modernize, strengthen, and make more effective the Federal Policy for the Protection of Human Subjects that was promulgated as a Common Rule in 1991. In order to help the public better understand the goals and impact of the new proposals, the Office for Human Research Protections (OHRP) has developed six webinars covering key aspects of the NPRM. The webinars aim to explain the NPRM proposals that are most relevant to each topic.

To watch the webinars, please visit the ACTS Advocacy page.
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News from ACTS


ACTS Member Highlight: Share Your Exciting News Stories with Us!
Save the Date Now for Translational Science 2016

Translational Science News


Translational Research Focus of NIDA Organizational Shift
Scientists Create World's Largest Catalog of Human Genomic Variation
Regulating Research in Academia
FDA Awards 18 Grants to Stimulate Product Development for Rare Diseases
NIH Framework Points the Way Forward for Building National, Large-Scale Research Cohort

Grant Opportunities


NINDS Institutional Center Core Grants to Support Neuroscience Research (P30)
Centers Without Walls for Collaborative Research in the Epilepsies: Developing Transformative Therapies for Modifying or Preventing Epilepsy (U54)
Collaborative Research in Genomics, Epigenomics, and Bioinformatics in Gynecologic Health and Disease (R01)


News from ACTS


ACTS Member Highlight: Share Your Exciting News Stories with Us!

Share Your Exciting News Stories With Us! Does your institution have news you want to share with the ACTS Connection readership? Do you have an investigator doing something innovative? Let us know! From innovative projects, star scholars and trainees, to award winning faculty, help us share the news that is important to you by submitting it through our online form.

Your news may be shared on the ACTS website, and other ACTS social media sources!
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Save the Date Now for Translational Science 2016

Mark Your Calendars! Translational Science 2016 will take place April 13-15 at the Omni Shoreham Hotel in Washington, DC. Registration for Translational 2016 is expected to open in December 2015.
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Translational Science News


Translational Research Focus of NIDA Organizational Shift

As part of an effort to place more emphasis on translational research, the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) has reorganized, with a structure that now incorporates research on clinical neuroscience, brain development, and behavioral treatment development into existing and newly formed parts of NIDA. An advisory council workgroup evaluated the institute earlier this year and recommended "an organizational structure that would strengthen functional integration throughout NIDA and continue to emphasize translational neuroscience, brain development, and neurobehavioral interventions research as core elements of NIDA's mission," said Dr. John Rotrosen, professor of psychiatry at New York University School of Medicine and Workgroup Chair. The changes, which take effect Oct. 1, 2015, also come as the National Institutes of Health launches the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development Study, landmark research on substance use and adolescent brain development that will involve about 10,000 children.

From "Translational Research Focus of NIDA Organizational Shift"
NIH News (10/01/15)
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Scientists Create World's Largest Catalog of Human Genomic Variation

A team of scientists from the 1000 Genomes Project Consortium has created the largest catalog of human genomic differences, which can help researchers better understand many diseases. This catalog more than doubles the number of known variant sites in the human genome. The National Human Genome Research Institute helped fund and direct the international public-private consortium that developed the catalog. In a study published online in Nature, researchers identified about 88 million sites in the human genome that vary among people, allowing them to establish a database to be used as a standard reference for genetic variations in populations and around the world.

From "Scientists Create World's Largest Catalog of Human Genomic Variation"
NIH News (09/30/15)
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Regulating Research in Academia

Responding to a request from Congress, the National Academy of Sciences recently issued a report on the regulation of research universities, in which the authors recommend modifications to burdensome or duplicate regulations. They also recommend the establishment of a Research Partnership Board (RPB), funded by research universities, and a new position at the Office of Science Technology and Policy to be a liaison to the government for the new RPB. The report's authors noted that regulations could create a high opportunity cost if a scientist is focused more on compliance than his or her research, which could then limit the effectiveness and impact of the research.

From "Regulating Research in Academia"
The Hill (09/29/15) Shapiro, Stuart
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FDA Awards 18 Grants to Stimulate Product Development for Rare Diseases

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) announced on Sept. 21 that it has given research grants worth more than $19 million to stimulate the development of drugs for rare diseases. In all, 18 grants were awarded to principal investigators in 10 states. "The FDA is in a unique position to help those who suffer from rare diseases by offering important incentives to promote the development of products, one of which is our grants program," said Gayatri R. Rao, director of FDA's Office of Orphan Product Development. "The grants awarded this year support much-needed research in 17 different rare diseases, many of which have little, or no, available treatment options."

From "FDA Awards 18 Grants to Stimulate Product Development for Rare Diseases"
FDA News Release (09/21/15)
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NIH Framework Points the Way Forward for Building National, Large-Scale Research Cohort

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) Advisory Committee to the Director presented a framework for building a cohort of at least 1 million Americans to expand knowledge and practice of precision medicine. NIH plans to build the infrastructure soon enough that participants can begin enrolling in 2016, with enrollment expected to last three to four years. Participants would volunteer to share core data, such as electronic health records, health survey information, and data on lifestyle habits. Participants also will be partners in research development and implementation, and will have significant representation in governance and oversight.

From "NIH Framework Points the Way Forward for Building National, Large-Scale Research Cohort"
NIH News (09/17/15)
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Grant Opportunities


NINDS Institutional Center Core Grants to Support Neuroscience Research (P30)

The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) has issued a funding opportunity announcement (FOA) seeking applications for Center Core Grants that provide resources and facilities shared by a minimum of six NINDS-supported investigators. According to the FOA, the proposed Centers should provide services and skills that would be difficult or impractical to support in individual labs. NINDS plans to commit $2 million to fund about five awards in fiscal year 2016. Each application may request up to $400,000 annually in direct costs, with a maximum project length of four years. The application deadline is Dec. 9, 2015.

From "NINDS Institutional Center Core Grants to Support Neuroscience Research (P30)"
NIH Grants (09/28/15)
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Centers Without Walls for Collaborative Research in the Epilepsies: Developing Transformative Therapies for Modifying or Preventing Epilepsy (U54)

The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), is soliciting applications for an Epilepsy Center without Walls. This center will be focused on collaborative preclinical and clinical research to prepare for translational and clinical development of epilepsy therapies. The center also will seek to develop community partnerships and resources to advance the development of such therapies. The application is for a cooperative agreement, through which NIH intends to fund one award, corresponding to $3 million in direct costs for fiscal year 2016. The award will support preclinical and clinical "readiness" studies before launching proposed therapies into full-scale development. The application due date is March 8, 2016.

From "Centers Without Walls for Collaborative Research in the Epilepsies: Developing Transformative Therapies for Modifying or Preventing Epilepsy (U54)"
NIH Grants (09/24/15)
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Collaborative Research in Genomics, Epigenomics, and Bioinformatics in Gynecologic Health and Disease (R01)

Through the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) is soliciting applications for a grant to encourage the application of state-of-the-art genomic and epigenomic technologies for specific gynecologic health issues. This initiative's ultimate goal is to speed understanding of the pathophysiologic mechanisms behind gynecologic disorders and to inform the development of effective screening, therapeutic, and prevention strategies. NIH intends to commit about $2 million in the 2016 fiscal year to fund 2-8 awards. Applications are due by Dec. 10, 2015. Details about a companion R21 funding opportunity announcement are available here.

From "Collaborative Research in Genomics, Epigenomics, and Bioinformatics in Gynecologic Health and Disease (R01)"
NIH Grants (09/22/15)
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October 08, 2015


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